It was a blues number, a€?Save Me for Latera€? on her album, Me a€™n Mabel, that first worked its magic for me. Suzie has become recognized as an accomplished blues singer and guitarist, but she has many ways to seduce a listener.
Suzie would gravitate toward music as a kid a€” singing along to an ever-present flow of mainstream radio tunes would make her feel good a€” but becoming a musician was not a conscious thing. Her parents had what looked like a cool record collection, but the stereo was broken throughout her childhood.
The sole parental musical influence occurred when her father listened to country music in the car. By age 11, she also was playing saxophone in her grade-school concert band and singing in the chorus. While Suzie continued to explore other instruments, the guitar, in combination with her voice, got her noticed.
When she was in fourth grade, her teacher called the principal into her class and had Suzie sing a€?Country Roadsa€? for him and the class. She remembers at age 11 or 12, taking her allowance a€” she might have done a tiny bit of baby-sitting to add to her spending money a€” and going down to the Sears in downtown Saskatoon and plunking down $14 to buy her first album, Supertrampa€™s Breakfast in America. When she got a little older, she got her own small record player and would sing and play along with records alone down in the basement, her voice bouncing off of the faux paneling. I conjectured that playing the bass gave her a better sense of lower notes or the a€?bottoma€? in her guitar playing. In addition, she had discovered the Saturday jams at a blues bar, Buda€™s on Broadway, in Saskatoon. Over the years, Suzie has studied with a number of people and works today with a vocal coach when she can because therea€™s always something to learn. Fresh out of high school, Suzie attended the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon for a year.
At one of Tonya€™s shows, her brothera€™s friend introduced her to the man she would marry about five years later. She made some musical connections, did some gigs, and then got a full-time job working for Marty Simon, a film composer. Suzie also worked in other musical side projects to pay the bills, providing bass and lead and backing vocals. Betty & the Bobs is a 7-piece variety-show type band which plays quirky music that its members wouldna€™t play in other projects. Suzie did solo gigs with guitar all through the years with Rick and the other groups, and is now predominately a solo artist. 33 Stars, released in 2002, has a pop feel.while Happy Here, released in 2008, is rootsier.
Her most recent album, Live at Bluesville (2012), came about when a radio interview turned into a recording session. Although her parentsa€™ record player didna€™t contribute to to her development, her brother had a stereo that could crank out the decibels and he allowed her to listen to records on that.
Fresh out of high school, Suzie attended the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon for a year.A  She was in a general arts study program, which included drama and music theory. In between gigs, she worked the counter in a gas station, baby-sat and did other part-time work, such as helping an accountant with income tax preparation and cleaning houses.
In 1993, a serendipitous crossing of paths in Toronto proved very rewarding.A  Influential Canadian roots music DJ Chopper McKinnon met accomplished blues player Rick Fines for a beer. A brief Internet perusal reveals that Aphrodite had no musical skills and actually was a bit of a tramp. Situated midway between the east and west coasts, I thought that would make her the Canadian equivalent of a a€?Midwesterner.a€? She characterized it as more of a prairie environment, so a€?Ia€™m a a€?prairie girl,a€™a€? she said.
It was a large console that became more of a nice piece of furniture that they stored things in. She said that, a€?My voice was the first instrument that I got to play around with,a€? she said, a€?but I got bolder when I picked up the guitar.a€? It enabled her to accompany herself and she found a lot of cheerleaders among her teachers.


She perceived that the other guitar player in the concert band had a better understanding of jazz chords needed to play in the large band repertoire. While she didna€™t disagree, she felt, more importantly that it allowed her to a€?meter-map out how songs move chordally.a€? It was good for her ear, she added.
Her husband got a job in Toronto and they moved there in 1998, but the marriage ended shortly afterward.
From her Wikipedia page, we learn Happy Here was a nominee for Roots & Traditional Album of the Year a€“ Solo at the 2009 Juno Awards. He told Rick he shouldna€™t be sitting with him when he could go see the bass player at a different bar up the street. But if she could sing, with her seductive skills, it might produce the same effect that Suzie Vinnick does. Me a€™n Mabel (2011) shows Suziea€™s skills with just her and her Larrivee parlor guitar (christened Mabel as a result of a slip using the word a€?maplea€?). Since there was no bass in the orchestra, she asked her teacher if she could learn it and take that slot. She joined two female trios with different styles, Vinnick Sheppard Harte and The Marigolds. Kinga€™s Bluesville station, basically said a€?Herea€™s our studio, go in and have some fun!a€? The result was a typical Suzie tour de force of vocal and guitar.
Chopper knew that Suzie was playing bass for Back Alley Johna€™s band, which was in Toronto for a gig. Despite emigration during the 20th century, modern day Turkey continues a Jewish population.The present size of the Jewish Community is estimated at around 26,000 according to the Jewish Virtual Library. Her previous album, Happy Here (2008), is lushly orchestrated and shows Suziea€™s ability with a torch song. I just liked the idea of singing songs off the radio.a€? She continued guitar lessons for two years, but there there were other instruments on her radar. Her voice teacher, Naomi Freisen, was a classical singer but still appreciated the a€?Broadway beltera€? style and was able to help her with blues and rock a€™n roll. Tony played in a style similar to guitar greats Albert King, Freddie King and Stevie Ray Vaughn.
He kept in touch and asked her to come out for a summer, saying that he had a bunch of gigs lined up. He told Suzie stories about the music business (some of them hair-raising, no doubt) and she learned a lot from him. He told Suzie stories about the music business (some of them hair-raising, no doubt)A  and she learned a lot from him. She tried the upright bass for a bit, but didna€™t care for it and settled with the electric. Suzie had no commitments in Saskatoon and enjoyed her time in Ottawa over the summer, so she decided to move there. Rav Izak Haleva, is assisted by a religious Council made up of a Rosh Bet Din and three Hahamim. Of the tracks I sampled, I was really impressed with the covers of a€?Big Yellow Taxi and a€?Love Hurts,a€? from My Favorite Shirt. The Marigolds was a more delicate, folkier group with a€?killer songwriters and singers who could pour out jazzy vocals,a€? Suzie said. Suziea€™s robust vocals did a strut all over Tonya€™s snarling guitar licks while her bass provided a relentless throb below. Founded by Ashkenazim of Austrian origin in 1900, it is the last remaining synagogue among a total of three built by Ashkenazim. Visits con be made during weekday mornings and for Shabbat services on Saturday mornings.,The Neve Shalom Synagogue ,uilt and opened in 1951 and the scene of a tragic terrorist attack in 1986, it is the largest synagogue in Istanbul where most of the religiou,s ceremonies are held. The Neve Shalom is open to the public for morning visits during the weekdays and for Shabbat prayers every Saturday morning.,,The Ahrida Synagogue ,Located in Balat near the Golden Horn, built by Jews of Ohri (Macedonia) more than 550 years ago and recently renovated during the Quincentennial Celebrations in 1992, the Ahrida Synagogue is known foremost by its boat-shaped bimah. It can only be visited during weekday mornings.,Etz Ahayim Synagogue ,Located in Ortakoy, near the European leg of the Bosphorus Bridge.


When the previous synagogue burned down in 1941 with only the marble Aron-ha-Kodesh remaining, the new synagogue was rebuilt on the location of the then midrash. Indeed, Turkey could serve as a model to be emulated by any nation which finds refugees from any of the four corners of the world standing at its doors.In 1992, Turkish Jewry celebrated not only the anniversary of this gracious welcome, but also the remarkable spirit of tolerance and acceptance which has characterized the whole Jewish experience in Turkey. The events being planned - symposiums, conferences, concerts, exhibitions, films and books, restoration of ancient Synagogues etc - commemorated the longevity and prosperity of the Jewish community. As a whole, the celebration aimed to demonstrate the richness and security of life Jews have found in the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic over seven centuries, and showed that indeed it is not impossible for people of different creeds to live together peacefully under one flag.,A History Predating 1492 The history of the Jews in Anatolia started many centuries before the migration of Sephardic Jews.
A bronze column found in Ankara confirms the rights the Emperor Augustus accorded the Jews of Asia Minor.Jewish communities in Anatolia flourished and continued to prosper through the Turkish conquest.
When the Ottomans captured Bursa in 1326 and made it their capital, they found a Jewish community oppressed under Byzantine rule.
Sultan Orhan gave them permission to build the Etz ha-Hayyim (Tree of Life) synagogue which remained in service until nineteen forties.Early in the 14th century, when the Ottomans had established their capital at Edirne, Jews from Europe, including Karaites, migrated there.
In fact, from the early 15th century on, the Ottomans actively encouraged Jewish immigration.
In 1537 the Jews expelled from Apulia (Italy) after the city fell under Papal control, in 1542 those expelled from Bohemia by King Ferdinand found a safe haven in the Ottoman Empire. Half a century later, 8070 Jewish houses were listed in the city.The Life of Ottoman Jews For 300 years following the expulsion, the prosperity and creativity of the Ottoman Jews rivalled that of the Golden Age of Spain. Another Portuguese Marrano, Alvaro Mendes, was named Duke of Mytylene in return of his diplomatic services to the Sultan.Salamon ben Nathan Eskenazi arranged the first diplomatic ties with the British Empire.
As a result, leadership of the community began to shift away from the religious figure to secular forces.,,World War I brought to an end the glory of the Ottoman Empire.
In 1926, on the eve of Turkey's adoption of the Swiss Civil Code, the Jewish Community renounced its minority status on personal rights.During the tragic days of World War II, Turkey managed to maintain its neutrality. As early as 1933 Ataturk invited numbers of prominent German Jewish professors to flee Nazi Germany and settle in Turkey. Before and during the war years, these scholars contributed a great deal to the development of the Turkish university system. During World War II Turkey served as a safe passage for many Jews fleeing the horrors of the Nazism. While the Jewish communities of Greece were wiped out almost completely by Hitler, the Turkish Jews remained secure.
The vast majority live in Istanbul, with a community of about 2.500 in Izmir and other smaller groups located in Adana, Ankara, Antakya, Bursa, Canakkale, Kirklareli etc.
There are about 100 Karaites, an independent group who does not accept the authority of the Chief Rabbi.Turkish Jews are legally represented, as they have been for many centuries, by the Hahambasi, the Chief Rabbi. Fifty Lay Counsellors look after the secular affairs of the Community and an Executive Committee of fourteen runs the daily matters. Representatives of Jewish foundations and institutions meet four times a year as a so-called ??think tank?? Some of them are very old, especially Ahrida Synagogue in the Balat area, which dates from middle15th century.
The 15th and 16th century Haskoy and Kuzguncuk cemeteries in Istanbul are still in use today.,??The Museum of Turkish Jews??
Additionally, the Community maintains in Istanbul a school complex including elementary and secondary schools for around 700 students.
Turkish is the language of instruction, and Hebrew is taught 3 to 5 hours a week.,While younger Jews speak Turkish as their native language, the over-70-years-old generation is more at home speaking in French or Judeo-Spanish (Ladino).



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