November 12, 2009--After 60 years in a watery Hawaiian grave, two World War II-era Japanese attack submarines have been discovered near Pearl Harbor, marine archaeologists announced today.
Since 1992 archaeologist Terry Kerby and colleagues at the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory have hunted for the samurai subs in manned submersibles. The results of the sub surveys are "information we're sharing across the Pacific," Van Tilburg added, noting how much has changed politically since World War II. Listen to your favorite National Geographic news daily, anytime, anywhere from your mobile phone. It's not used in WWII: this is militarezed version of Vespa, produced in 1952 for France Army. WW2inColor is made up of a large WW2 photograph collection of over 40,000 images which have been viewed over 95 million times in total over the last few years. Between 1939 and 1945, one of the worst wars in history was fought out between two opposing forces that were so large and wide-spread, it became known as the Second World War.
The control system had a lens attached to the missile which projected an image of the target to a screen.
The National Defense Research Committee put $25,000 for research into the project but despite this, for some unfathomable reason, the US military didn’t take the idea too seriously.


The Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment in Manchester, UK began work in 1940 on attaching rotor blades to a jeep. The jeep was then fitted with additional equipment including the rotor blades, a tail fairing with twin rudderless fins, a rotor control next to the steering wheel and glider navigational instruments. The initial flights had limited success as handling proved difficult but after some modifications, the flying qualities of the vehicle were officially described as “highly satisfactory”. Navy seized the Japanese fleet in the Pacific, including five samurai subs, as they're called in the new film.
Our upload feature allows website visitors to add related WW2 images and other historic documents for educational purposes.
In a bid to stop Adolf Hitler and his allies, who were known as the ‘Axis’ powers, the ‘Allies’ worked on many weapons projects to try to develop new ways to help them win the war.
Skinner hit on a novel idea for the war effort when he came up with the idea for ‘Project Orcon’ (which stood for organic control), which was his attempt to produce the world’s first pigeon-guided missile. Three trained pigeons would then peck at the target on the screen and where they pecked would determine where the missile hit.
Nicknamed the ‘Rotabuggy’, initial tests involved dropping the jeep from heights of a few meters while it was filled with concrete to demonstrate it could take the impact without damage.


In 1943, the first test flight was conducted when the Rotabuggy was toed behind a Bentley and managed to glide at speeds of up to 65 mph. However the project became deemed unnecessary with the development of Horsa II and Hamilcar which were gliders equipped to carry vehicles. The subs were later sunk, to keep the technology out of the hands of the Soviet Union.The military didn't record where the boats had been laid to rest, thinking no one would want to know. While many were successful and eventually helped the allied cause, other ideas that went into development ended up being shelved, often because they were just a little too weird to work!
The I-400--one of the largest non-nuclear submarines ever built--and the I-203 remain missing.



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